Posts

Showing posts from 2019

Secondary Dominants and Inside to Outside Scale Choices

Image
from Chapter 32 of An Approach To Jazz Piano Dominant scales can either reflect the tonality of the key center or can imply a direction away from it. The direction away from a tonal center using the dominant scale/chord as the medium, can be either towards the flat direction, or towards the sharp direction. A combination using elements of both directions may be used to modify one direction or the other. In Figure 1 the cycle of sharps and flats is presented to help illustrate direction ideas. Figure 1 If G7/mixolydian is the most inside dominant 7th chord/scale in C, G altered dominant has the most notes out of the key of C that a G7 can have while still retaining a dominant 7th quality (see Figure 2). Figure 2 Before outlining directional intent in secondary dominants, it is necessary to discuss the primary dominant (G7 in C major) in order to establish a working order of dominant scales.  This working order of dominant scales will include those that are more inside

My Romance with Rock Triad Progressions

Image
From Chapter 11 of An Approach To Jazz Piano .  This video is a demo of some ideas for applying "rock triad progressions" to the well known standard "My Romance." You might remember this idea, but have a look at this previous post to review of the so called (Rock Progressions—really like darker colour shifts): Rock/Blues Triad Progressions This next video is a take on this, applied to My Romance.  Get a lead sheet of My Romance and follow along... For an in-depth introduction to rock/blues triads, see Chapter 11 of An Approach To Jazz Piano .